Coaching for the Gifted & for Highly Sensitive Persons
Agreed, bringing these two topics of intelectual giftedness and high sensitivity together onto a single page might suggest more common ground than there actually is, when these actually are two distinctive topics.

Intellectual Giftedness

Giftedness has been a subject of quite some institutional research for a while. IQ tests confer intelligence a certain measurability (although perhaps not a measurable certainty). These tests are regularly recalibrated so that a person with results at least four standard deviations from average (presuming a Gaussian distribution of intelligence) will score at 130 or above. But the matter is losing its mathematical (or rather probabilistic) clarity. There is a growing sense that a written, standardised test cannot really seize the manifold diversity of intelligences and giftedness. For instance, how could it measure a giftedness in fine arts or crafts, all the more by merely ticking multiple choice answers? How could a single figure reflect creations being born without any words or numbers but instead out of matter from gifted hands? How could a figure measure excellence in these text- und numberless talents? With the concept of intelligence losing its sharpness, so does giftedness. Somewhere on the spectrum of growing intelligence, there seems to be a point where the simple "more" turns into "different". This otherness may make things difficult when it comes to finding the right vibe or tone for interacting with others without standing out in a fashion that may cause others to feel uneasy or to start sending subtle and less subtle warning signals or even turning people away, because they experience these interactions as destabilising or even transgressive. Some people suggest that intellectually gifted people also are highly sensitive persons (HSP) much more often than on average. There currently seems to be no strong evidence to support this. It rather may be that for outside observers, somebody observing the world with a sharp mind and a sense for details might seem to be highly sensitive, when it is an intellectual rather than an emotional skill. But who knows? In the end, there can be an irreducible otherness that can impede opening up to others, especially with somebody who already has a record of experiencing this otherness to be the reason for rejection by others. After all, in this time, the world seems rather more than less prone to judge without further consideration, isn't it? Sometimes, a gifted person will unconsciously entangle herself or himself into an apparently consistent system of thought and cannot find the way out anymore. Perhaps sometimes somebody from outside cand lend a friendly, helping hand. Take a breath in that open-minded space of exchange with me, devoid of stereotyped judgments.

High Sensitivity

Contrary to intellectual giftedness, research on high sensitivity as a specific topic is scarce - perhaps because in this loud world, high intelligence is valued as a resource and high sensitivity is not? Some people doubt that a specific high sensitivity actually exists and rather surmise some form of neurosis or self-obsession. Nonetheless, Elaine Aron's famous questionnaire (available on many web sites) for Highly Sensitive Persons (HSP) stirs quite some resonance with people who sense things with an intensity that others cannot comprehend. And then there are these people who perceive so many things that perception alone can wear them out after a while. This intensity of perception quite often comes with some lack of self-assurance or even with low self-esteem. Yet, Western societies and their built-in rewarding systems still seem to value assertiveness and aplomb a lot, and the lack thereof can lead to situations that are experienced as humiliating. But humiliation also teaches humility. And humility may appear as a forgotten virtue in these strident times. Perhaps humility, conjoined with gratitude, are essential means to access the Heart, or even are ingredients of the immune system of the Heart (not meaning the organ here), as counter-intuitive as this might seem. That way, what seems a "weekness" becomes a resource. And that is only the beginning. Having sharp perceptive skills may be exhausting sometimes. But why should it be an impairment? In a world that does not seem to find its solutions in the noise, could they not reside in the islands of stillness? If you would like to design your personal compass to navigate through uncertain times, or to simply talk about your future and what you may try to make differently from now on, why don‘t you make an appointment with yours truly?

Alexander Hohmann

Systemic Coach in Freiburg (Black Forest)

Alexander Hohmann Systemic Coach in Freiburg (Black Forest)
Coaching for the Gifted & for Highly Sensitive Persons
Agreed, bringing these two topics of intelectual giftedness and high sensitivity together onto a single page might suggest more common ground than there actually is, when these actually are two distinctive topics. Intellectual Giftedness Giftedness has been a subject of quite some institutional research for a while. IQ tests confer intelligence a certain measurability (although perhaps not a measurable certainty). These tests are regularly recalibrated so that a person with results at least four standard deviations from average (presuming a Gaussian distribution of intelligence) will score at 130 or above. But the matter is losing its mathematical (or rather probabilistic) clarity. There is a growing sense that a written, standardised test cannot really seize the manifold diversity of intelligences and giftedness. For instance, how could it measure a giftedness in fine arts or crafts, all the more by merely ticking multiple choice answers? How could a single figure reflect creations being born without any words or numbers but instead out of matter from gifted hands? How could a figure measure excellence in these text- und numberless talents? With the concept of intelligence losing its sharpness, so does giftedness. Somewhere on the spectrum of growing intelligence, there seems to be a point where the simple "more" turns into "different". This otherness may make things difficult when it comes to finding the right vibe or tone for interacting with others without standing out in a fashion that may cause others to feel uneasy or to start sending subtle and less subtle warning signals or even turning people away, because they experience these interactions as destabilising or even transgressive. Some people suggest that intellectually gifted people also are highly sensitive persons (HSP) much more often than on average. There currently seems to be no strong evidence to support this. It rather may be that for outside observers, somebody observing the world with a sharp mind and a sense for details might seem to be highly sensitive, when it is an intellectual rather than an emotional skill. But who knows? In the end, there can be an irreducible otherness that can impede opening up to others, especially with somebody who already has a record of experiencing this otherness to be the reason for rejection by others. After all, in this time, the world seems rather more than less prone to judge without further consideration, isn't it? Sometimes, a gifted person will unconsciously entangle herself or himself into an apparently consistent system of thought and cannot find the way out anymore. Perhaps sometimes somebody from outside cand lend a friendly, helping hand. Take a breath in that open-minded space of exchange with me, devoid of stereotyped judgments. High Sensitivity Contrary to intellectual giftedness, research on high sensitivity as a specific topic is scarce - perhaps because in this loud world, high intelligence is valued as a resource and high sensitivity is not? Some people doubt that a specific high sensitivity actually exists and rather surmise some form of neurosis or self- obsession. Nonetheless, Elaine Aron's famous questionnaire (available on many web sites) for Highly Sensitive Persons (HSP) stirs quite some resonance with people who sense things with an intensity that others cannot comprehend. And then there are these people who perceive so many things that perception alone can wear them out after a while. This intensity of perception quite often comes with some lack of self- assurance or even with low self- esteem. Yet, Western societies and their built-in rewarding systems still seem to value assertiveness and aplomb a lot, and the lack thereof can lead to situations that are experienced as humiliating. But humiliation also teaches humility. And humility may appear as a forgotten virtue in these strident times. Perhaps humility, conjoined with gratitude, are essential means to access the Heart, or even are ingredients of the immune system of the Heart (not meaning the organ here), as counter-intuitive as this might seem. That way, what seems a "weekness" becomes a resource. And that is only the beginning. Having sharp perceptive skills may be exhausting sometimes. But why should it be an impairment? In a world that does not seem to find its solutions in the noise, could they not reside in the islands of stillness? If you would like to design your personal compass to navigate through uncertain times, or to simply talk about your future and what you may try to make differently from now on, why don‘t you make an appointment with yours truly?